Hot Best Seller



Batwoman: Elegia

Availability: Ready to download

Ela é a Batwoman, a mais recente inimiga do crime em Gotham, e irá confrontar-se com um estranho e violento culto, liderado pela misteriosa assassina Alice, que planeia mergulhar a cidade num pesadelo à imagem do País das Maravilhas. Mas nesta aventura as aparências iludem, e a própria Batwoman ver-se-á mergulhada num terrível pesadelo pessoal. O escritor Greg Rucka e o art Ela é a Batwoman, a mais recente inimiga do crime em Gotham, e irá confrontar-se com um estranho e violento culto, liderado pela misteriosa assassina Alice, que planeia mergulhar a cidade num pesadelo à imagem do País das Maravilhas. Mas nesta aventura as aparências iludem, e a própria Batwoman ver-se-á mergulhada num terrível pesadelo pessoal. O escritor Greg Rucka e o artista J. H. Williams juntam forças para reinventar uma das personagens mais icónicas da DC, num dos livros graficamente mais espectaculares dos últimos anos.


Compare

Ela é a Batwoman, a mais recente inimiga do crime em Gotham, e irá confrontar-se com um estranho e violento culto, liderado pela misteriosa assassina Alice, que planeia mergulhar a cidade num pesadelo à imagem do País das Maravilhas. Mas nesta aventura as aparências iludem, e a própria Batwoman ver-se-á mergulhada num terrível pesadelo pessoal. O escritor Greg Rucka e o art Ela é a Batwoman, a mais recente inimiga do crime em Gotham, e irá confrontar-se com um estranho e violento culto, liderado pela misteriosa assassina Alice, que planeia mergulhar a cidade num pesadelo à imagem do País das Maravilhas. Mas nesta aventura as aparências iludem, e a própria Batwoman ver-se-á mergulhada num terrível pesadelo pessoal. O escritor Greg Rucka e o artista J. H. Williams juntam forças para reinventar uma das personagens mais icónicas da DC, num dos livros graficamente mais espectaculares dos últimos anos.

30 review for Batwoman: Elegia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 81% | Very Good Notes: Wherein smokey eyes mean trouble and Mucha-esque art nouveau shines in jagged panels and double-page spreads.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Kind of hesitating between 3 and 4 stars for this one. I enjoyed Rachel Maddow's intro and the art was good. The story was OK for a Batwoman origin story. I enjoyed the throwback art too. I don't know what bugged me about the story, but it was entertaining nonetheless and quite original. I am not too familiar with the Batwoman lore to know whether the author has taken excessive liberty here or not. Perhaps a commenter will set me straight? :)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: Gorgeous art. Compelling story. A lesbian character who isn't a caricature. A female character who kicks ass but still has a soul. A backstory that is heart-wrenching in it's authenticity. Hell yeah, I love it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Seth T.

    On Monday, I read two comics. One was pretty great and the other was Batwoman: Elegy. This is not to say that Elegy was bad. Unfortunately, it never actually gets better than pretty good. The Rucka-penned adventure comic certainly has some worthwhile moments and Williams' art is varied enough to impress, but the book has several problems that prevent it from being better than it could be. But let's put the problems on hold for a moment to focus on what the book gets right. [I suppose some caveat On Monday, I read two comics. One was pretty great and the other was Batwoman: Elegy. This is not to say that Elegy was bad. Unfortunately, it never actually gets better than pretty good. The Rucka-penned adventure comic certainly has some worthwhile moments and Williams' art is varied enough to impress, but the book has several problems that prevent it from being better than it could be. But let's put the problems on hold for a moment to focus on what the book gets right. [I suppose some caveat should be interjected here. I am pretty much entirely unacquainted with Batwoman or Kate Kane (who plays Batwoman in the comic book adaptation of her life). I've read a couple Batman books over the years, so I have a tacit understanding of his mythology. I know enough about Cassandra Cain and Barbara Gordon to know about their relationship as Batgirl and Oracle (though I don't know if they're still maintaining those identities). And I remember a couple years ago, there were some news items about a Batwoman who was a lesbian and that she was somehow involved with Renee Montoya, a lesbian Gotham cop that I vaguely recall from the animated Batman series from a few years back. So there. That's it vantage from which I'm approaching the book. Those thoroughly embroiled in the Bat-universe might have appreciated the book a lot more than I did.] So yeah, the good. Well for one, J.H. Williams III is quite evidently a talented illustrator and designer. The page layouts are sometimes wild and abstracting and sometimes tame and straightforward. Which I imagine is meant to reflect the mood or era of that portion of the story. Which mostly works. Mostly. More on this later. What else is good? Rucka's story (somewhat), as well as the section on— You know what? No. *sigh* I'm sorry. I. I can't do this. The book was crap. It had moments that weren't but those were smothered the sheer weight of the rest of the book's abject silliness. It was a frustrating experience made more frustrating by the praise the book had received. Okay, so I'm going to talk a little specifically about some things that might count as spoilers (even though its their inclusion in the book at all that spoils Elegy), so be forewarned. No seriously, don't read any further if you don't want the mid-book Plot Twist exposed. Alright, good? Kate Kane has an evil twin whom she thought was dead. And is the book's villain. And speaks only in quotations from Through the Looking Glass. [Okay seriously? I really shouldn't even have to continue this review. I'll grant that I'm not really familiar with the kinds of stories that Batman fans have to put up with, so maybe this kind of thing is commonplace and readers have long become dead to the sense that what they're reading is stupider than Twilight or even The Da Vinci Code.] To be fair, Rucka tries really hard to build some emotional resonance into the twin thing, even if he doesn't do anything to make it sound even remotely plausible. He doesn't quite succeed, but at least he put the effort in. So yes, Batwoman's dead sister comes back to haunt her dressed as an adult lolicon version of Alice. She keeps a poisoned razor blade under her tongue, but you wouldn't know it for how much she talks. And amusingly enough, we're never given the slightest indication of a) why she's alive, b) why she's attacking Gotham/Batwoman, or c) why she quotes Through the Looking Glass incessantly. If Rucka was going to include a dead twin who quotes Alice, then those are really the only three things that I, as a reader, care about. Even if they aren't answered in this book, I at least want to see it hinted that the answers are out there. And you know what? As much as I've read people praise Williams' art in Elegy, his heavily designed pages actually work to hinder the reading of the book. Especially in the segments when Kate Kane is doing her Batwoman thing, there are a number of two-page spreads. The problem is that Williams often leaves no indicators as to the order in which a reader should approach the panels on these pages. He's not consistent and so I often found myself reading the book in the wrong order. Which, as you can imagine probably, is obnoxious. *sigh* Okay. Let's end this on some positive notes. Here are a list of the things about the book that worked. • Scenes in which Kate Kane mills about in the civilian world, interacting with a stepmom she resents or a society she feels at odds with. If Rucka and Williams wanted to do an indie comic about a lesbian woman in her early thirties and the day-to-day trials of life she'd have to go through, this would make a good start. • Kate's dismissal from military service for her homosexuality under don't ask/don't tell is rather well done and is perhaps The emotive moment of the book. Moreso than even the flashback in which we witness the death/supposed death of Kate's mother and sister. • Kate's relationship with her dad. This was fairly well done for a superhero book and we get to understand just how a father could assist his daughter in becoming a masked vigilante. • Batwoman's nipples presenting through her bulletproof and knife-resistant body suit. Just kidding. That was as stupid as it sounds. Though not as stupid as the twin thing. [Review courtesy of Good Ok Bad]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I have some mixed feelings about this one. I'll start with the good. This Batwoman was an entirely new character to me. Apparently she'd shown up in 52, but I avoided that and so went in knowing nothing. And Kate Kane is a really likeable character. The big news when she was introduced was the fact that she's a lesbian. I was honestly relieved to discover that it's not a major plot point or source of drama: she simply is a lesbian. It only becomes an issue in her backstory, when she falls afoul o I have some mixed feelings about this one. I'll start with the good. This Batwoman was an entirely new character to me. Apparently she'd shown up in 52, but I avoided that and so went in knowing nothing. And Kate Kane is a really likeable character. The big news when she was introduced was the fact that she's a lesbian. I was honestly relieved to discover that it's not a major plot point or source of drama: she simply is a lesbian. It only becomes an issue in her backstory, when she falls afoul of Don't Ask, Don't Tell. And even that is beautifully understated, in a way that makes it even more emotionally resonant and honest. I also like how her motivations for crime fighting differ from Batman's: like Superman, she fights crime because of a sense of duty, not because of a tramatic past. The art is just fantastic. It's stylish and atmospheric. There's a definite effort to make Batwoman every bit as iconic as Batman, with her very white skin, blood red hair, and black and red costume. If this version of Batwoman really takes off, it'll be easy to recognize her in even very short appearances. That's good, obviously. It's a dull superhero indeed who isn't instantly recognizable. The art is even great in Kate's private life. Some of the best panels in the entire book deal with her personal life. I'm thinking especially of the ones where she has to leave the army, and later comes out to her father. They're silent, subtle, and powerful. However, the layouts can sometimes get a bit too clever for their own good, getting a touch confusing. Doesn't happen often, though. The storyline here is a continuation of her appearances in 52, which can be a bit of a barrier to a new reader like myself. I mean, werewolves show up out of nowhere, and how am I supposed to deal with that in a Bat book? Some more context would have been nice. It also ends very abruptly, but this is just the first few issues of an ongoing series. Obviously, this is meant to be the start of a great mythology. It isn't exactly compelling, though. That can be mostly attributed to the villain that's the focus here. Her name is Alice, and she speaks only in lines from the Alice books. She seems to be an attempt to make a character every bit as striking and menacing as Joker (she even has white facepaint) with trendy Alice in Wonderland references. She just doesn't work for me. I have a hard time believing that somebody who speaks only in quotes from a Victorian children's book could plan, let alone communicate, the evil plot Alice has in this book. Her connection to Batwoman is way too neat to be plausible, too. This could be a really great book, but it falls just a little short. Part of that is probably because it is part of what is meant to be an ongoing story, and maybe reading it all together would help. But the unconvincing villain would need to be improved first.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I was a bit confused with this book’ storyline, this being my first exposure to the world of Kate Kane aka Batwoman. There were references to death cults who previously stabbed her in the heart and this being her second run at an age old prophecy; then there was the inclusion of animal people (who are they? Where did they come from?) I was a bit lost at sea despite being familiar with the superhero world of DC. I liked that DC made her a gay superhero but didn’t make it a big deal or central to I was a bit confused with this book’ storyline, this being my first exposure to the world of Kate Kane aka Batwoman. There were references to death cults who previously stabbed her in the heart and this being her second run at an age old prophecy; then there was the inclusion of animal people (who are they? Where did they come from?) I was a bit lost at sea despite being familiar with the superhero world of DC. I liked that DC made her a gay superhero but didn’t make it a big deal or central to the story. It’s good to see a company as big as DC embracing equal rights. But the best thing about the book is something everyone has noted in the reviews – JH Williams III’s artwork. It is ravishing! I read “Desolation Jones” a few years ago because I’m a big fan of Warren Ellis’ but was amazed at the detailed artwork in the book. The biggest reason for picking up this book was so I could see this artist’s work again and boy was it worth it. As for the writing though, Greg Rucka is a competent writer but by no means a great writer. His work here is average at best; it pushes the story forward but doesn’t provide any memorable scenes or great lines. It’s your basic Batman/Joker storyline without the Y chromosome. Which leads me to the villain – Alice. Not only is the “Alice in Wonderland” theme overplayed in the Batman world but Alice is distinctly like Harley Quinn in every way except appearance and only then just barely. She’s just not that original a villain. And if I’m honest, neither is Batwoman that compelling a character. Her origin story is gone into here but as a superhero? She’s kind of sub-par. I mean, her dad saves her on two occasions and on another a weird band of animal people save her. I just don’t think she can match Batman or even lesser DC superheroes like Aqua Man or Wonder Woman. The origin story was ok as it contained enough mystery to give the earlier, action heavy opening chapters more depth, but I wasn’t as blown away by this book as I’d been expecting given the hugely positive reviews. The book stands out for the art rather than the average writing and by-the-numbers plotting, and while I think Batwoman is an interesting character I feel Greg Rucka isn’t the writer to make her a great superhero. “Elegy” is probably great if you love the character and know her story a lot more than I did and while this can be read more or less as a standalone, it’s not nearly as amazing a book as other reviewers have said. It’s a decent read just don’t expect anything original – except for the exceptional artwork.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    4 stars but I'm giving some credit because this art was fucking fantastic! Okay, so the storyline with Alice was a little difficult to follow. The art is so incredibly gorgeous and creepy. The colors are fantastic! I love they change to a darker, more Sin City-esque vibe when she's Batwoman to show the clear dichotomy between her attitude then versus Kate Kane. It made the action scenes a lot more engaging and cool and gave them a sleek feel I don't think I've seen before in comics. I love who K 4 stars but I'm giving some credit because this art was fucking fantastic! Okay, so the storyline with Alice was a little difficult to follow. The art is so incredibly gorgeous and creepy. The colors are fantastic! I love they change to a darker, more Sin City-esque vibe when she's Batwoman to show the clear dichotomy between her attitude then versus Kate Kane. It made the action scenes a lot more engaging and cool and gave them a sleek feel I don't think I've seen before in comics. I love who Kate Kane is as a character. I didn't know really anything about her before reading this. I really enjoyed her in the animated film Batman: Bad Blood and I love her in the Detective Comics Rebirth series. She's an interesting take on a superhero because she used military training but was dishonorably discharged because of her sexuality. One of the most moving scenes in this book was the one where she tells her commanding officer that she won't deny the claims and comes out because she truly believes in the tenets they were taught. It makes her a great role model and cements her as an honest hero. It's weird how rare that is. I enjoyed seeing her complex relationship with her father. It's weird how separate they seem from her step-mother and step-sister. I really like the way they portrayed her kidnapping. The angles chosen put you in Kate's POV and gave it an added layer of fear. That art kind of reminded me of Aja's art in Hawkeye, as well. The story itself is a little hard to follow. I think this book worked best when it was telling Batwoman's origin story. It was a lot more cohesive, in my opinion. Because of the odd way Alice spoke, I wasn't always sure what was going on, what her goals were or if she had any at all. The reveal could have come off as a little cheap but, I don't know a ton about Kate's history. I'm looking forward to reading more about her and I can't wait to read more of Rebirth: Batwoman. 4 stars.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Well, I just found another favorite superhero. This comic was so well-written. Greg Rucka just became a writer I will watch out for. I decided to read this Batwoman comic because I saw that Rucka wrote it, and I recognize his name because of his big Wonder Woman bisexuality reveal recently. And the artwork was fascinating. The paneling and coloration was stands out a lot and it worked well with this story. It's serious but hopeful. The background story here is so compelling. Rucka did a fantastic Well, I just found another favorite superhero. This comic was so well-written. Greg Rucka just became a writer I will watch out for. I decided to read this Batwoman comic because I saw that Rucka wrote it, and I recognize his name because of his big Wonder Woman bisexuality reveal recently. And the artwork was fascinating. The paneling and coloration was stands out a lot and it worked well with this story. It's serious but hopeful. The background story here is so compelling. Rucka did a fantastic job with a character that probably comes off to many as a female Batman clone and she's so much more than that. I'm really appreciative of the LGBTQ+ representation in media, especially superhero stuff and comics. I know a lot of people don't understand the need for it, but for me and other people in the marginalized group it really helps us feel like we aren't so alone.

  9. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    Prior to this gorgeous incarnation, Batwoman has always seemed to me to be a weak character. One that nobody seemed to write well and in turn made the fans care very little. She was little else but a spin-off of the Batman mythos, just another Robin, and nothing so interesting as to warrant an in-depth analysis of her character or her stories. Batwoman and Batgirl both seem to harken back to that time before the Frank Miller 80's revamp of the caped crusader, candy colored clowns that were comic Prior to this gorgeous incarnation, Batwoman has always seemed to me to be a weak character. One that nobody seemed to write well and in turn made the fans care very little. She was little else but a spin-off of the Batman mythos, just another Robin, and nothing so interesting as to warrant an in-depth analysis of her character or her stories. Batwoman and Batgirl both seem to harken back to that time before the Frank Miller 80's revamp of the caped crusader, candy colored clowns that were comic relief or filler in a brightly colored world that should have been written in black and white. But here we have something altogether new. A new start to the Batwoman character that is most assuredly worthy of her own stories and her own mythos with little to no help from the Bat himself. A character that is deserving of being seen solo in the pages of Detective Comics. A character I am craving more of. I've just finished reading this only minutes ago. It was mesmerizing. Mainly because of the expert art. I'm a man who is a fan of confident lines. And the highly stylized art in this book made me think at times of Alphonse Mucha, father of graphic design from the early 1900s. It was reminiscent of fin de siècle Vienna with all of it's handbills and gorgeously designed announcements. It spoke to a higher form of art in it's paneling and in it's confident style, almost breezy in places, at times possibly narcissistic. And I loved it's arrogance and sense of bravado. Because it matched the character and the writing. The greatest part of the writing, of the story, is that Rucka did not hand her Batman's leftovers, but instead gave her her very own antagonist. A new and very deadly villain, so intriguing to me for the likeness to the Mad Hatter and the Joker, but that it could stand out so sharply and not simply be a simulacrum of those characters. And the same is said for the Batwoman in these books. She is nor just an effigy, nor is she wholly a mirror of Batman. She is something altogether her own and I thank Greg Rucka for giving me something I could never have expected.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Was good but the New52 Batwoman did it better. Still fun, the art is great, but the story didn't grab me like that series. Sorry for short reviews, just been busy, but still worth checking out to learn about Batwoman!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I know that everyon has been talking about this book for a while, and perhaps everything that needed to be said has been said, but do lets keep talking. We should talk about the art, which is beautiful and perfect--especially those splash panels and the bat-shaped frames. Because this Batwoman is everything that Batgirl always should have been: strong, separate, and capable. She stands on her own, inspired by Batman but never his in any material way. We should talk about Batman's cameos and how I know that everyon has been talking about this book for a while, and perhaps everything that needed to be said has been said, but do lets keep talking. We should talk about the art, which is beautiful and perfect--especially those splash panels and the bat-shaped frames. Because this Batwoman is everything that Batgirl always should have been: strong, separate, and capable. She stands on her own, inspired by Batman but never his in any material way. We should talk about Batman's cameos and how they consist entirely of him watching her fight her own battles. He offers support, but she doesn't need it. We should talk about the other cameo as well, because Kate Kane is forced to leave Westpoint rather than tell a lie, and Dan Choi is there. Because comic books don't exist in a vacuum, especially not this one. But this is a comic book--a batbook nonetheless--so there is a Lewis Caroll inspired villain and silly fights and outrageous animal-men. This is an excellent comic book, a personal story, and a worthy hero. I'm a little in love with her, but then, all the girls are. I want to keep talking about her until she isn't the lonely representative of this style any longer. And also, she needs to get back together with Renee Montoya because they are perfect for each other.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Greg Rucka likes (and is good at) writing strong female characters. Starting with Whiteout, with Queen and Country: The Definitive Edition, Vol. 1, and more recently with Stumptown, Vol. 1 (and subsequent volumes for each series), he gave us complex, layered characters that never felt *clichéd* or stereotypical, with emotional, action-packed storylines. He continues this in "Batwoman: Elegy". In this book, he establishes the modern Batwoman as a compelling character by giving her a dark, heart-b Greg Rucka likes (and is good at) writing strong female characters. Starting with Whiteout, with Queen and Country: The Definitive Edition, Vol. 1, and more recently with Stumptown, Vol. 1 (and subsequent volumes for each series), he gave us complex, layered characters that never felt *clichéd* or stereotypical, with emotional, action-packed storylines. He continues this in "Batwoman: Elegy". In this book, he establishes the modern Batwoman as a compelling character by giving her a dark, heart-breaking origin story and by giving her her own nemesis: Alice. It is hard to elaborate without spoiling the book. Suffice it to say that there are a number of reveals in this book that will make you want to re-read it and even go back and re-read Batwoman's stories in "52" (though they are not required reading). On the art side, prepare to be blown away by the always incredible JH Williams III. From his truly ingenious page layouts to his varied art styles, this book was a visual treat from cover to cover. The art varies in style but never in quality. Check out some of his other work in Batman: The Black Glove and the book-end issues of Grant Morrison's "Seven Soldiers of Victory" Seven Soldiers of Victory Book One & Seven Soldiers of Victory Book Two. I got much more than I expected from this book, and it still left me wanting more. What else can I tell you? This book is worth it. 4 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Wow, I'm surprised by how much I love this book. What's it about: Batwoman was nearly killed by a bats*** crazy cult and now she plans on taking down their new leader. Why I love this book: The story is very interesting. As someone who enjoys stories of vigilantes and stories of cults, I certainly like the mix of those from this book. Fantastic art! Lots of beautiful panels. The panel layout is unique and freaking awesome. This is (unlike most big 2 books) quite tricky and unpredictable. Very happy, su Wow, I'm surprised by how much I love this book. What's it about: Batwoman was nearly killed by a bats*** crazy cult and now she plans on taking down their new leader. Why I love this book: The story is very interesting. As someone who enjoys stories of vigilantes and stories of cults, I certainly like the mix of those from this book. Fantastic art! Lots of beautiful panels. The panel layout is unique and freaking awesome. This is (unlike most big 2 books) quite tricky and unpredictable. Very happy, surprised and impressed with that. The characters are well written and Rucka really makes me care about them despite me only having read a few issues with the title character making an appearance before reading this. I definitely care about her now. The action is pretty sweet! Dramatic and slightly emotional ending. I like that Rucka can write a lesbian character without the topic being beaten to death like many books with diverse characters. Overall: No problems. I only read this because it was sitting on the shelf at the library and I noticed Rucka's name because I read volume 1 of Lazarus earlier this year and really liked it (need to read more of that, probably soon). I definitely really like and highly recommend this one!

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This book was more like an acid trip than a detective story. This book series is missing the Bruce Wayne character tremendously.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

    So, I picked this up after reading some of the hype about how Batwoman is a lesbian and it is awesome, but I kind of felt like it was just ok and maybe people were overreacting to the whole thing in general. One of the interesting things about Batwoman is that it is one of the few comic books that actually uses a full-on cover style of art throughout the entire book. And like any comics fan, there have definitely been a lot of times when I've bought a comic based on the cover art and felt sort o So, I picked this up after reading some of the hype about how Batwoman is a lesbian and it is awesome, but I kind of felt like it was just ok and maybe people were overreacting to the whole thing in general. One of the interesting things about Batwoman is that it is one of the few comic books that actually uses a full-on cover style of art throughout the entire book. And like any comics fan, there have definitely been a lot of times when I've bought a comic based on the cover art and felt sort of disappointed that the entire book couldn't be drawn in that same cool, elaborate style. But reading Batwoman, I think I actually get why most comics DON'T try to do that and not just because of the production values of creating and printing it. While I really do think the Batwoman art style would look gorgeous as a poster on the wall or as a cover and I like her character design a lot, I think using that same art style throughout the main narrative of the book is actually kind of jarring. I mean, I really appreciate artistic flourishes in comic books. I appreciate the unique stylistic touches comic book artists put in. I can dig a creative layout. And not only that, I think comic book artists SHOULD be experimenting with that stuff and pushing the boundaries and really striving not just to illustrate the story, but to tell the story through the art. However, I also think that sometimes when artists get too caught up in the look of the comic book it can actually start to get in the way of your immersion into the story. By the time I finished reading the book, my eyes felt exhausted by taking in all of the colors and slick graphics and layout designs. It is kind of like when you get a huge piece of an incredibly rich chocolate torte. The first couple bites are amazing, but by the time you finish the whole slice you're really grossed out. In terms of the writing, the story felt like pretty standard comic book fare to me. Ok story, but not really knocking my socks off and the whole don't ask, don't tell component felt a bit forced to me. I did enjoy getting the chance to read about a lesbian superhero character I guess, but as a long-time Hothead Paisano, maybe not as novel or important seeming to me as it was to some folks who place a higher value on the "mainstream" comics industry. I also kind of felt like the radical potential of having a lesbian superhero was also a bit dampened for me by the fact that she's Batwoman, a female retread of a male mainstay of superhero comics. I mean, yes it's cool she's a lesbian, but she's also not really a hero in her own right, but still a weird, ghettoized offshoot of the big tent in the circus. Call me when one of the big, main male superheros turns out to be gay or when a female superhero really breaks into superstardom in her own right.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    When I first read about Batwoman, my initial reaction was: "Cool! A gay, bat-related superheroine!" Then I thought, pretty much immediately right after: "Let's hope that gay isn't all she is." And then I waited. Then came the previews. I still remember that I was taken aback by the red and black, and I wasn't sure I could like this. But then I actually read the preview and knew that I *had* to have this. When the first issue was finally, finally released I was completely blown away. I had somewha When I first read about Batwoman, my initial reaction was: "Cool! A gay, bat-related superheroine!" Then I thought, pretty much immediately right after: "Let's hope that gay isn't all she is." And then I waited. Then came the previews. I still remember that I was taken aback by the red and black, and I wasn't sure I could like this. But then I actually read the preview and knew that I *had* to have this. When the first issue was finally, finally released I was completely blown away. I had somewhat muddled expectations, I suppose, but this was *so* good. The artwork was so different and expressive and beautiful, and Batwoman herself - I was completely and utterly in love with her. Reading this as a whole now was a great experience. This story does a wonderful job introducing her while also connecting to her first introduction back in "52". And she's more than just a gay, female Batman. There's nothing I don't love about this book, really, but my favorite part is Kate's relationship with her father. The scene where she comes out to him and his reaction is so powerful and beautiful, I really don't have any words.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anna (Bananas)

    5 stars for the art. The drawing and colors are absolutely gorgeous. 3 stars for the story. I like the character of Kate Kane, especially that she's a lesbian superhero with a military background. I like that she's tough but still feminine. The villain was visually stunning (and based on Alice in Wonderland, which I love) but not very interesting, except for the surprise twist. And she was dispatched way too quickly. It felt like there was much more to explore. Overall a worthwhile comic. 5 stars for the art. The drawing and colors are absolutely gorgeous. 3 stars for the story. I like the character of Kate Kane, especially that she's a lesbian superhero with a military background. I like that she's tough but still feminine. The villain was visually stunning (and based on Alice in Wonderland, which I love) but not very interesting, except for the surprise twist. And she was dispatched way too quickly. It felt like there was much more to explore. Overall a worthwhile comic. I'm on to Batwoman Hydrology next.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Callie Rose Tyler

    #1) Ugh! Magic! As a general rule, I'm not a fan. Werewolves and other were-creatures? No thanks! Unless they were bitten by a radioactive animal or are genetically engineered keep them out of my superhero comic books! #2) Religious fanatics...double ugh! I feel like I get enough of this in the real world, plus it seems like an overused cop-out. What is their motivation?...uh a cult, a crazy cult, that I...uh don't have time to explain but trust me....they are K-razy There's fun Joker crazy and t #1) Ugh! Magic! As a general rule, I'm not a fan. Werewolves and other were-creatures? No thanks! Unless they were bitten by a radioactive animal or are genetically engineered keep them out of my superhero comic books! #2) Religious fanatics...double ugh! I feel like I get enough of this in the real world, plus it seems like an overused cop-out. What is their motivation?...uh a cult, a crazy cult, that I...uh don't have time to explain but trust me....they are K-razy There's fun Joker crazy and then there's annoying cult crazy, I prefer less of the latter, thank you very much! If you're going to put religion into the story you better include Whoopi, anything else doesn't fly with me. #3) That "What the hell is going on" feeling. I totally did not get the whole Alice character. Not only does Gotham already have a bunch of Wonderland themed villains with no relation, but it was never explained. Why does this girl call herself Alice? Why does she speak in Lewis Carroll quotes? What is the connection? It was all so incredibly random. Was Greg Rucka just like, "Hmmmm I want a crazy character, you know what's weird? Alice in Wonderland. Oh, great idea, people freakin love Alice in Wonderland! Bingo, Bango, Boom! Done and Done" NO! Stop! Yes, I love Alice in Wonderland but that doesn't mean I blindly adore everything Wonderland. Overall, this book vacillated between interesting and boring. Oddly enough I disliked the passages featuring Batwoman and found that I was more interested in Kate Kane's life, relationships, and backstory. The art is nice, I mean truly beautiful, but it often felt like the layout and organization was more about form over function.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sans

    I started working in a different city a few weeks ago, one that I have to commute by train to get to. That means no car to toodle around in during lunch or after work, and I'm now in the exact opposite direction of the comic shop I used to go to. I did some quick mapping online and found a new shop that is sorta local to my office and decided to get a Lyft there from work. Best decision of my life. The fella that owns the shop is great, super helpful, and recommended a bunch of graphic novels to I started working in a different city a few weeks ago, one that I have to commute by train to get to. That means no car to toodle around in during lunch or after work, and I'm now in the exact opposite direction of the comic shop I used to go to. I did some quick mapping online and found a new shop that is sorta local to my office and decided to get a Lyft there from work. Best decision of my life. The fella that owns the shop is great, super helpful, and recommended a bunch of graphic novels to me after I told him my life story of comic reading (and leaving and coming back to the fold once again). This was one of the books he suggested based on my desire to see more queer representation in sequential art. I was not disappointed. I think I mentioned in my review of Grayson, Volume 1: Agents of Spyral that I had not previously read DC comics but was enjoying dipping my toe into the pool. This book felt like I was diving into the deep end. I felt a bit lost to start with but by the end I felt like I knew enough to get by and to keep me interested. The plot was fast-paced, the writing outstanding, the difference between the here-and-now hyper-visual art and what the shop owner described as similar to an Archie-style in the flashbacks really added to the experience. Now I need to find the next volume to see what happens to Kate.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Griffin

    BATWOMAN: ELEGY, written by Greg Rucka and illustrated by the fabulously talented J. H. Williams III, collects Detective Comics #854-#860 in one volume. It is the story of Batwoman’s battle with Alice, the High Madame, in protecting Gotham from Alice’s evil plot. Also included is the back-story of Kate’s growing up, her coming out at West Point and to her father, Colonel Kane, and the origins of her career as Batwoman. All of this is in one trade paperback! Alice, the Lewis Carroll-quoting villai BATWOMAN: ELEGY, written by Greg Rucka and illustrated by the fabulously talented J. H. Williams III, collects Detective Comics #854-#860 in one volume. It is the story of Batwoman’s battle with Alice, the High Madame, in protecting Gotham from Alice’s evil plot. Also included is the back-story of Kate’s growing up, her coming out at West Point and to her father, Colonel Kane, and the origins of her career as Batwoman. All of this is in one trade paperback! Alice, the Lewis Carroll-quoting villain, not only has Gotham on the edge of destruction, she also has a secret for Kate. I was a little confused sometimes when Alice would speak – apparently I’m not up to snuff on the story of Alice in Wonderland, even though I read the book six years ago. Not a big deal, the story is understandable and of course, the artwork is OUTSTANDING! I’m a huge fan of J. H. Williams III’s work. His detailing in this volume is, as always, amazing and the characterizing is powerful. You know exactly how the individuals are feeling. I loved this collection and highly recommend it for others who enjoy graphic novels!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Althea J.

    How can I adequately express how amazing Elegy is? - Kate Kane is my hero in every way. A badass, filled with integrity, and beautifully flawed. - The art was mind blowingly gorgeous. For real. Innovative and fluid and straight up gorgeous. Just unlike anything else. - If rec’ing a comic to a non comic reading friend, I would hand them Elegy. Elegy tells several stories. The Batwoman backstory: the personal family tragedy deeply embedded in Kate Kane’s past, and the path that led Kate to becoming Ba How can I adequately express how amazing Elegy is? - Kate Kane is my hero in every way. A badass, filled with integrity, and beautifully flawed. - The art was mind blowingly gorgeous. For real. Innovative and fluid and straight up gorgeous. Just unlike anything else. - If rec’ing a comic to a non comic reading friend, I would hand them Elegy. Elegy tells several stories. The Batwoman backstory: the personal family tragedy deeply embedded in Kate Kane’s past, and the path that led Kate to becoming Batwoman. Her passionate need to serve justice and the greater good, even when her country rejects her because of her sexuality (one of the most iconic pages of comics, ever). Greg Rucka writes a woman with depth and nuance. Elegy also is the story of a nemesis of sorts, Alice. The suspense and intrigue surrounding Alice really pulled me in. Yet even the villain serves to add more depth to Kate's story. Brilliant. I highly rec.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Yet another solid piece of work by Greg Rucka, with stellar artwork by J.H. Williams III. I've not read anything about Kate Kane before, I knew through context she was Batwoman, but that was it. This is a great stand alone intro to the character. A very strong story which gives great motivation to the character and what she's all about and who she is. A little more on the outside of the Batman Family than most but still a very loosely connected part. Batman makes an appearance but not a huge rol Yet another solid piece of work by Greg Rucka, with stellar artwork by J.H. Williams III. I've not read anything about Kate Kane before, I knew through context she was Batwoman, but that was it. This is a great stand alone intro to the character. A very strong story which gives great motivation to the character and what she's all about and who she is. A little more on the outside of the Batman Family than most but still a very loosely connected part. Batman makes an appearance but not a huge role. A very important book for the role given to a big enough character as a Lesbian. Gotham seems to be great for Lesbian characters, with Renee Montoya, Maggie Sawyer (via Metropolis) and Kate Kane. That may seem not important but way to go with being part of this century now. Well worth reading, a great place to start with Batwoman, it was for me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    This book was stunning. I devoured it in a couple of hours. The continuation of the "Religion of Crime" story arc that Rucka started back in the mid 2000's, the covens of crime have a new leader, Alice, a doll-like interpretation of a Lewis Caroll nightmare that only speaks the words that Alice uttered in Wonderland. Also, as an added bonus, Rucka throws in the origin story of the comic-book worlds greatest lesbian character, Batwoman. With cameo's from Dick Grayson and Renee Montoya, this has t This book was stunning. I devoured it in a couple of hours. The continuation of the "Religion of Crime" story arc that Rucka started back in the mid 2000's, the covens of crime have a new leader, Alice, a doll-like interpretation of a Lewis Caroll nightmare that only speaks the words that Alice uttered in Wonderland. Also, as an added bonus, Rucka throws in the origin story of the comic-book worlds greatest lesbian character, Batwoman. With cameo's from Dick Grayson and Renee Montoya, this has to be one of the best comics I've read since "Identity Crisis"; it has a brilliant twist in the plot, is beautifully drawn and coloured, and is hot, hot hot.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    I was hopeful for this, as this Batwoman's queer, and the art is stunning at first glance. When I actually sat down to read it, panel to panel, I had a hard time following the plot, and the beautiful pages were sometimes not super great at leading me through the correct order to read the panels. Which I see as a storytelling failure in this medium. I probably would have soldiered through, but for a looming due date. Take all of my superhero-related reviews with a grain of salt. :) Refraining from a I was hopeful for this, as this Batwoman's queer, and the art is stunning at first glance. When I actually sat down to read it, panel to panel, I had a hard time following the plot, and the beautiful pages were sometimes not super great at leading me through the correct order to read the panels. Which I see as a storytelling failure in this medium. I probably would have soldiered through, but for a looming due date. Take all of my superhero-related reviews with a grain of salt. :) Refraining from a star since I didn't finish it, and not out of objective faults of the book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Holy crap, the artwork in this is just woah. Though the plot was somewhat lackluster and ended quickly, the backstory was something amazing. I'm impressed that DC managed to make a strong heroine who's sexy--and doesn't need to wear next to nothing to show it--and is also a lesbian. They got just about everything right with Batwoman. How did they manage to fail so badly with the new 52 when it's clear they can do such great things with their female characters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Probably my favorite Batwoman graphic novel simply because I really liked the Alice in Wonderland crossover. Beautiful art & panels for the beginning, toward the end the style changed though. Not a huge fan of Batwoman but if you are this is the book for you.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Throughout his legacy, Batman has found himself countless allies to help him fight crime in the dirty and dangerous streets of Gotham. While some were recruited for their assets, others proved their worth through action rather than words. There is, however, always a line of conduct that is similar in every single one of these heroes and it is what brings them to work together. It is that silver lining that allows them to strike evil right in the You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Throughout his legacy, Batman has found himself countless allies to help him fight crime in the dirty and dangerous streets of Gotham. While some were recruited for their assets, others proved their worth through action rather than words. There is, however, always a line of conduct that is similar in every single one of these heroes and it is what brings them to work together. It is that silver lining that allows them to strike evil right in the face, with their fists or batarangs. Among these heroes, Batwoman, also known as Katherine “Kate” Kane, cousin to Bruce Wayne, is a hero that has quickly garnered a lot of attention. As a gay superhero, she is a symbol of a fiery passion for justice, smoothened by a seductive and teasing crime-fighting approach, yet very dangerous to anyone who finds themselves in her way. What is Batwoman: Elegy about? Collecting Detective Comics #854-860, the story introduces Batwoman’s vigilantism debut in Gotham City while the Dark Knight is missing following Infinite Crisis. Dawning the blood-red bat symbol, Kate Kane is pitted against a madwoman known as Alice who runs around with a deep appreciation for Alice in Wonderland. With only her father to assist her on her war on crime, as well as her military background, she looks to stop Alice from unleashing a toxic death cloud on her city but an unimaginable revelation will flip her life upside down and resurge tragic memories from her childhood. Kate Kane was once a soldier who had to choose a dishonorable discharge for the sake of maintaining her self-respect and fighting for what she believes in. Throughout the story, there are glimpses of her character traits that are explored discretely, from her sexual preference for women to her lack of fear and thirst for adrenaline, that allow the reader to grasp her unique personality. Her past plays a major role on her current mindset, as she thrives to fight off wrongdoers while abiding by Batman’s code. Although this is an excellent entry point for new readers who want to find out Batwoman’s origins, it does have some moments that instills doubt in the reader’s understanding of the events that unfold, with humanesque creatures surging into the narrative and grafting in a story where she was once stabbed in the heart by an odd cult. The artwork is foremost the most obvious appeal of this story arc. What J.H. Williams III has accomplished is a stunning work of art that gives Batwoman a terrifying yet dazzling image as a vigilante, while coating her with the appropriate amount of beauty and intellect to highlight her strengths. There is also a very original attempt to shift the artwork style according to the context, allowing the reader to easily note the differences in tone and time, as it changes whether she’s out as Batwoman, as Kate Kane or when we’re visiting her past. This isn’t, however, to say that the visual style is flawless. There are a couple of issues that are worth noting and among those is the extremely ambitious ideas in the panel configuration on every page. There’s an overlaying theme of a hallucinogenic story-telling that is portrayed throughout sequences when she roams the city in her suit. Some of these pages are difficult to follow with there being very little clues to what the reading order of some dialogue bubbles actually is. It should also be mentioned that the visuals convey a somewhat sexualized portrayal of her character that could be distracting at times, especially when her suit is somehow bulletproof while so incredibly skin-tight to the point where the curves of her nipples are more than visible. This style does, however, continue to emphasize her character’s sexuality, especially when her difficult but promiscuous love life is quickly glanced over throughout the story. Batwoman: Elegy is a beautiful yet disorienting origin story that introduces Kate Kane through her feud with the madwoman Alice and unveils the past that has led her to become another guardian of Gotham City. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    When my brother loaned me this book, knowing that I really dislike DC comics as a general rule (exceptions being Secret Six and Gotham Central), he warned me that I was supposed to read it for the art, not the story. I read a few reviews on GoodReads and found that most people had similar warnings. With those warnings in mind, I was able to really enjoy this book. Rucka's story is, indeed, silly stuff. Batwoman gets into a fight with the leader of a cult of crime (that seems to be an actual relig When my brother loaned me this book, knowing that I really dislike DC comics as a general rule (exceptions being Secret Six and Gotham Central), he warned me that I was supposed to read it for the art, not the story. I read a few reviews on GoodReads and found that most people had similar warnings. With those warnings in mind, I was able to really enjoy this book. Rucka's story is, indeed, silly stuff. Batwoman gets into a fight with the leader of a cult of crime (that seems to be an actual religious cult, not just an alliterative name for a gang, and is therefore eye-roll material) who speaks only in Lewis Carroll quotes (which is an irritating and preposterous quote, but at least Rucka commits to it and plays by his own rules) and dresses like a model for "Victoria's Secret for the Criminally Insane." The story, while silly and kind of pointless, is better than I expected from (1) my low expectations of DC, and (2) the dire warnings from other readers. Yes, the secret identities thing is kind of stupid, but with a strict interpretation of the internal story logic, it doesn't break any rules. Plus, it only takes the first half of the collection, and the second half is devoted to Batwoman's origin as a former Marine who is discharged because of a refusal to lie when confronted with a Don't Ask, Don't Tell situation. This origin is a little too earnest and After School Special, but by comic book standards, it's surprisingly respectful and emotionally honest (for contrast, Marvel's gay characters, like Moondragon, Martyr, Hulking, and Wiccan, tend to be ridiculous, with lines like, "Why, yes, I think we should go after this villain, and did I mention that I am in a loving relationship that is just as valid as other relationships?" "I am shocked at this surprise betrayal by a teammate.. and.. I intend to talk about it with my girlfriend, who is just as competent a life partner as a theoretical boyfriend!"). Batwoman is clear about her sexuality without being awkward and obnoxious. Good job, Rucka. Of course, after devoting energy to trying to minimize the impact of a stupid story, it's only fair that I turn to the artwork in this book, which is every bit as good as everyone says. Williams presents his Batwoman scenes in delicate and textured paint effects, getting energetic action scenes across with the expertise of a Renaissance painter. He sacrifices narrative clarity for imaginative imagery sometimes (I'm thinking of a page with a motorcycle riding across the entire page, leaving beautiful lines that give absolutely no clue that the reader is supposed to read three panels, then look at the long lines, then go back to the fourth panel.. and also of a haunting yin/yang spread with the heroine and the villainess reflected in a circle on a black background, which is unforgettable but presents a few story-telling panels that are nearly incomprehensible), but it doesn't happen that often, and the story is dumb anyway. What I especially love about the artwork in this book is that Williams shifts to a completely different style when Batwoman is not in costume. In her civilian identity, Kane wanders through life in very ordinary images, competent but not memorable, and she only visually comes alive when she dons the flowing red wig. It's a beautiful artistic choice, perfectly executed, and it helps to turn this book into a treasure.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Adam Bain

    I came into this book completely blind to any Batwoman history, thankfully this got me up to speed quickly. Not only does she stand alone as a great character, but she doesn't rely on the Batman mythos to make her great. When I first started reading this I was worried how they where going to do her backstory and personality. When you create a character based in Gotham and the name has the word Bat in it, you have to tread lightly so you don't end up in the shadow of one of the most iconic heroes I came into this book completely blind to any Batwoman history, thankfully this got me up to speed quickly. Not only does she stand alone as a great character, but she doesn't rely on the Batman mythos to make her great. When I first started reading this I was worried how they where going to do her backstory and personality. When you create a character based in Gotham and the name has the word Bat in it, you have to tread lightly so you don't end up in the shadow of one of the most iconic heroes ever created. I was glad to see a completely fresh character with Kate Kane, not only is she nothing like Bruce Wayne in personality, but the trouble she faces as a heroine. By now you probably know that she is gay, but apart from the few times where it has some "okay we get that she likes woman, stop shoving it in our faces" moments it's a nice spin. A lot of dialogue in the book refers to a past event that happened in the 52 series, of which I'm really looking forward to read. None of this takes away from the pace of the writing though as you eventually fit the pieces together. The first half of the book revolves around a new leader for the followers of the crime bible, first off I have to say what a stupidly long name for a criminal organisation. I've encountered them in the pages of the New 52's All Star Comics with Jonah Hex, didn't know they had been going strong this whole time. Their new leader Alice, based around the Alice and Wonderland character, is out for Kate's heart as part of some twisted prophesy. Oh and she's bat-shit crazy! The connection between Alice and Batwoman took me by surprise and something tells me we haven't seen the last of her. The second half of the book reveals Kate's origins from a child, showing what made her into the heroine she is today. All of this is accompanied by the beautiful art of J.H Williams III, who does some absolutely amazing panel layouts. I was planning on reading this before I started on her New 52 title as I believe it kicks off right after this. If your looking for a heroine that kicks ass with no powers, then this could be one for you. I feel like I'm now prepped and ready to hit the first volume of her new series!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Vishakha ~ ReadingSpren ~

    A more beautiful Graphic Novel has not been created. The closest that comes to it is Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. J. H. Williams III is a master of his craft and has created a beautiful, intense and visually stunning story. This is not a comic book. This is art. But sometimes too much of a good thing can spoil a creation. It is beautiful, but confusing to read. Volume 0 of Batwoman contains many 2-page spreads but its never clear which sequence one should follow to read it. This A more beautiful Graphic Novel has not been created. The closest that comes to it is Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. J. H. Williams III is a master of his craft and has created a beautiful, intense and visually stunning story. This is not a comic book. This is art. But sometimes too much of a good thing can spoil a creation. It is beautiful, but confusing to read. Volume 0 of Batwoman contains many 2-page spreads but its never clear which sequence one should follow to read it. This is the first time that something like this has ruined a reading experience for me. I didn't even know it was possible, but there I was sitting frustrated with a Graphic Novel which is clearly so good. It was irritating and exhausting. The fun of reading a glaringly brilliant piece of work was lost completely. Greg Rucka's Kate Kane has become one of my favorite characters ever, a fact that has nothing to do with another fact that she is the only canon gay superhero in DC (which is awesome btw). She is smart, intelligent, tough-as-nails and most importantly, human. She is a rebel. She is proud. She is defiant. She is ridiculously charismatic. The way Williams has designed her, she is not conventionally beautiful, not in the way that many other super-heroines are, but you can't take your eyes off her. And when I heard that she was a lesbian, I was ready to find some half-cooked lesbian porno scenes, but the creators have treated her love life and sexual orientation with nothing but respect. Being gay is a very integral part of her personality but it is not the most important. What truly defines Kate Kane is courage and defiance. As complex as Kate was, the main antagonist of this Volume-Alice, was equally flat. A white gothic lolita quoting Lewis Caroll was probably not a very good idea. The mad-villain-with-white-face-paint (or skin in this case) has already been done with Harley Quinn which was honestly far more satisfying than Alice.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.